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Archaeologists Find 2,300-Year-Old Bark Shield in England


A unique bark shield from the Iron Age has been discovered by a team of archaeologists from the University of Leicester and elsewhere. The bark shield was found in 2015 at the Iron Age site of Everards Meadows near Enderby in Leicestershire. The object, which measured 26.3 x 14.6 inches (67 x 37 cm) in [...]

Tags: England
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Hubble Captures Stunning Image of Messier 59


The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has produced this beautiful image of an elliptical galaxy called Messier 59. Messier 59, also known as M59 or NGC 4621, lies some 50 million light-years away in the equatorial constellation Virgo. German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler discovered this galaxy and the nearby Messier 60 in the spring of 1779 [...]

Tags: Germany, SPA, NASA
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New Nerve Stimulation Therapy Could Help Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke


In a study involving 1,000 patients from 18 countries, an international team of researchers found evidence that a technique called active nerve cell cluster stimulation reduced the patients’ degree of disability three months after they suffered an acute cortical ischemic stroke. The first treatment for ischemic stroke, the clot-dissolving drug alteplase, was approved by the [...]

Tags: Cher
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Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs


Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive.

Tags: Planes
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Don't overdo omega-6 fat consumption during pregnancy


New research showed that eating a diet with three times the recommended daily intake of linoleic acid might be harmful in pregnancy.

Tags: Pregnancy
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

A gut check for heart failure patients


Heart failure patients who consume more dietary fiber tend to have healthier gut bacteria, which is associated with reduced risk of death or need of a heart transplant.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Growing up high: Neurobiological consequences of adolescent cannabis use


About one in five Canadian adolescents uses cannabis. Neuroscientists have been researching the effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain. Adolescence is associated with the maturation of cognitive functions, such as working memory, decision-making, impulsivity control and motivation, and the research presented suggests cannabis could have long-lasting, but possibly reversible effects on these.

Tags: EU, Scientists
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Weekly pharmacy visits boost drug adherence and quality of life in heart failure patients


Elderly patients with heart failure who see a pharmacist once a week are more likely to take their tablets and be active in daily life, according to new results.

Tags: Mac
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

In vitro fertilization linked to deadly heart disease in pregnancy


Women undergoing fertility treatment should urgently see their doctor if they have heart failure symptoms, according to a new study. Shortness of breath, swollen legs and waking up in the night to urinate could be warning signs of a pregnancy-associated heart failure called peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM).

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

New leaf shapes for thale cress


Scientists have determined how key developmental genes influence growth of cells to produce such differences in leaf form. The researchers were able to make thale cress, which typically produces simple leaves, grow leaves similar in complexity to those of hairy bittercress, a related plant with complex leaves.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride


Researchers have synthesized a powerful new molecule to trap chloride salts. The technology has the potential to reduce its seepage into freshwater systems, which is a threat to drinkable water around the globe.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation


Research groups have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma. Normally, proteins do not crystallize in the body, but there are some instances where this process does occur.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18


A swarm of more than 3,000 small earthquakes in the Maple Creek area (in Yellowstone National Park but outside of the Yellowstone volcano caldera) between June 2017 and March 2018 are, at least in part, aftershocks of the 1959 quake.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Older male crickets attract more females -- but mate less


Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them -- but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.

Tags: Malta
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Mites and ticks are close relatives, new research shows


Scientists have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species


What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? In a new study, researchers studied the genome of the alpine marmot. Results were unexpected: the species was found to be the least genetically diverse of any wild mammal studied to date. The alpine marmot has lost its genetic diversity during ice-age related climate events and been unable to recover its diversity since.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Simple test can tell if you're stressed out


Researchers have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva. Eventually, they hope to turn their ideas into a simple device that patients can use at home to monitor their health.

Tags: Cher, Ice T
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

How corn's ancient ancestor rejects crossbreeding


New research elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems


Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a new study.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Finding the cause of capacity loss in a metal-oxide battery material


Scientists studying a lithium-ion battery with an iron-oxide electrode as it charged and discharged over 100 cycles found that the loss is due to a buildup of lithium oxide and decomposition of the medium through which lithium ions flow.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

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