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New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in minimally conscious or vegetative state


Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialled for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials


Researchers have found a new way to optimize nickel by unlocking properties that could enable numerous applications, from biosensors to quantum computing.

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Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone


The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two -- and why?

Tags: Sex
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Variation in transplant centers' use of less-than-ideal organs


In 2010-2016, many US transplant centers commonly accepted deceased donor kidneys with less desirable characteristics. The use of these organs varied widely across transplant centers, however, and differences were not fully explained by the size of waitlists or the availability of donor organs.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Health care intervention: Treating high-need, high-cost patients


Patients with complex needs -- serious mental and physical health problems and substance use disorders -- flock to emergency rooms costing the health care system billions every year. A new study suggests a nontraditional approach to these patients can significantly improve their daily functioning and health outcomes.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels


A new study has found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles.

Tags: EU
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

When added to gene therapy, plant-based compound may enable faster, more effective treatments


Today's standard process for administering gene therapy is expensive and time-consuming -- a result of the many steps required to deliver the healthy genes into the patients' blood stem cells to correct a genetic problem. Scientists believe they have found a way to sidestep some of the current difficulties, resulting in a more efficient gene delivery method that would save money and improve treatment outcomes.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

A simpler way to make some medicines


Organic chemists have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs -- including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer -- are produced. Their discovery, published today in the journal Chem, gives drug makers a crucial building block for creating medicines that, so far, are made with complex processes that result in a lot of waste.

Tags: Cancer
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Research gauges neurodegeneration tied to FXTAS by measuring motor behavior


Researchers used a grip-force test to analyze sensorimotor function in people with the FMR1 premutation, with the aim of determining FXTAS risk and severity.

Tags: EU, Cher
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Male and female mice have different brain cells


Scientists discover that a brain region known to control sex and violence contains rare cell types that differ in male versus female mice.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Giant Dinosaurs Evolved Various Brain-Cooling Mechanisms: Study


Different groups of gigantic dinosaurs had different thermoregulatory strategies to help moderate brain temperatures in the face of high heat loads, according to new research from the Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Small dinosaurs could have just run into the shade to cool off, but for giant dinosaurs, the potential for overheating was [...]

Source: feedproxy.google.com

Stranded whales detected from space


A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images of the biggest mass stranding of baleen whales yet recorded. It is hoped that in the future the technique will lead to real-time information as stranding events happen.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Fundamental insight into how memory changes with age


New research could help explain why memory in old age is much less flexible than in young adulthood. Through experiments in mice the researchers discovered that there were dramatic differences in how memories were stored in old age, compared to young adulthood.

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Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution


Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. Evolutionary biologists have constructed a new family tree for this unassuming insect brood, shedding unexpected light on its evolutionary history.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Stem cell study offers new way to study early development and pregnancy


For the first time, researchers have created mouse blastocyst-like structures, or 'blastoids,' from a single cultured cell. The work could help advance research into development as well as inform issues around pregnancy, infertility, or health problems later in the offspring's life.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

BARseq builds a better brain map


A brain mapping technique called BARseq is capable of mapping thousands of neurons in a single mouse, at single neuron resolution, while also detailing which neuron expresses what genes. It could be a game-changer for how neuroscientists look at brains.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Parasite paralysis: A new way to fight schistosomiasis?


Scientists have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and cause devastating health problems. Researchers now describe the successful characterization of this chemical, which could help in finding new ways to fight the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Cystic fibrosis carriers at increased risk of digestive symptoms


Researchers have found that carriers of the most common genetic variant that causes cystic fibrosis experience some symptoms similar to those of people with cystic fibrosis. These findings were enabled by large-scale genomic data made available just a few years ago.

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Source: www.sciencedaily.com

An evolution in the understanding of evolution


An engineering professor and her former Ph.D. student share a new, more accurate method for modeling evolutionary change.

Tags: Students
Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife


Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Researchers increasingly are embracing the power of ancient DNA from old museum specimens to answer questions about climate change, habitat loss and other stresses on surviving populations.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

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