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An Air Force Pilot Tells Us What Flying a B-2 Stealth Bomber Is Like

17.07.2019 9:28


(Washington, D.C.) When B-2 stealth bombers attacked Serbia on the opening night of Operation Allied Force in 1999, destroyed Iraqi air defenses during 2003’s “Shock and Awe” and eliminated the Libyan fighter force in 2011 -- the attacks were all guided by highly-specialized pilots trained in stealth attack tactics.Given the dangers of these kinds of missions, such as flying into heavy enemy ground fire from air defenses, confronting the prospect of air attacks and preparing for electronic warfare over hostile territory, B-2 pilots need to be ready.“We prepare and train every single day in case we get called up tomorrow,” Lt. Col. Nicola Polidor, Commander of Detachment 5 of the 29th Training Systems Squadron, told Warrior in an interview.While performing missions, B-2 pilots need to maintain the correct flight path, align with specific targeting intelligence and load and prepare weapons, all while manning a digital cockpit to control a wide range of additional variables at one time. Polidor, who trains future B-2 pilots at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, says Air Force pilot trainees have adjusted well to learning a seemingly overwhelming amount of new information.“The biggest challenge for pilots is being able to manage flying for long periods of time at the same time as managing a communications suite and robust weapons package,” Polidor said.Polidor is only the 10th female B-2 pilot in history.Training is broken down into an academic phase and a flight phase, with classroom training as the first step. Trainees, Polidor explained, typically spend about two months working on a simulator, before taking their first flight.

From: news.yahoo.com

‘I saw hate in his eyes’: White security guard pulls gun on black police officer

17.07.2019 9:28


Sheriff’s deputy Alan Gaston thought they were on the same side.One man, Mr Gaston, was a high-ranking officer in the Lucas County, Ohio, sheriff’s department with 34 years of experience.The other was a security guard contracted to protect an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) office in Toledo.But then the guard pulled his gun. He raised his voice. He put a hand on Mr Gaston’s arm and rested his finger on the trigger.In a matter of seconds, what began with a routine errand at the IRS escalated into a frightening standoff between a white security guard and a black police officer, who said he heard hate in the guard’s shouts and believed he would be shot.“You don’t expect to be ambushed by someone who you think is on the same team,” Mr Gaston told The Washington Post.“I feel there was definitely some racial overtones involved. And I’m not the type of person to throw the race card, I’m just telling you the facts. I looked in his eyes and I saw hate in his eyes.”He had stopped by the IRS office during his shift on 31 May to ask a question about a letter the agency sent him.He was in full uniform, his badge and his firearm in clear view.The security guard, identified in court documents as Seth Eklund, asked Mr Gaston to leave his gun in his patrol car.When Mr Gaston replied he couldn’t do that, he said Mr Eklund became hostile. Mr Eklund accused Mr Gaston of reaching for his weapon, shouting “get your hands off your gun”, even though Mr Gaston said his hands were visible and nowhere near his holster.Mr Gaston, who has years of experience teaching defensive tactics, decided it was time for him to leave.He recalled a wide-eyed elderly couple in the office waiting room watching the exchange, and he said he feared for the bystanders’ safety. Mr Gaston turned to go.As he walked out of the cramped office, Mr Eklund drew his gun, trained it on Mr Gaston’s back and followed him. At one point, Mr Gaston said, Mr Eklund tried to arrest the uniformed officer.“He came around the corner with his weapon out, telling me, ‘you had your chance, you’re not going anywhere, I’m detaining you’,” Gaston said.“That’s when I was preparing myself to be shot. The hate and anger he had against me, I was getting ready to be shot by this security guard for no reason.”Mr Eklund, who could not be reached for comment, pleaded not guilty to one charge of aggravated menacing in a court appearance on Monday.Mr Gaston and his wife have also filed a lawsuit against Mr Eklund and the two security firms that apparently employed him.Representatives of those companies, Paragon Systems and Praetorian Shield, did not respond to requests for comment. The IRS declined to comment.The local news station WTVG published what it claims to be security camera footage of the interaction and The Washington Post obtained screenshots of the video.The images show Mr Gaston backing away and attempting to leave the building in an elevator. But Mr Eklund, gun still drawn, blocks the door with his foot.Mr Gaston says he felt cornered, scared. He took out his phone to take a picture of Mr Eklund, he said, and the security guard finally holstered his weapon.Heather Taylor, president of the Ethical Society of Police in St Louis, said that Mr Eklund behaved recklessly and likely would not have treated a white officer the same way.“We know what it’s like being an African American police officer in a city,” Ms Taylor said. “A lot of us realise that, hey, even though you’re in uniform, that doesn’t mean you’re safe.”The tense scene recalled other, infamous incidents with grisly endings. Ms Taylor pointed to the case of Jemel Roberson, a black security guard who was killed by a Midlothian, Illinois, police officer while they both responded to a shooting at the bar where Roberson worked.She also mentioned Detective Jacai Colson in Maryland, who was killed by a fellow officer while working undercover. Mr Colson, according to a lawsuit, had his badge in his hand and was shouting “Police! Police!” before he was killed.“You’re not given the benefit of the doubt as a minority,” Ms Taylor said. “It’s something we’ve been highlighting forever and now here’s another example of it.”She applauded Mr Gaston’s cool demeanour in the face of what she said was potentially lethal bigotry.Mr Gaston said he didn’t feel that Mr Eklund respected him as a law enforcement officer, and in more than three decades of police work has never dealt with anything like that.He was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression, he said. He’s been on medical leave and is seeing a counsellor twice a week. The civil suit Mr Gaston and his wife filed seeks compensation.The standoff between Mr Gaston and Mr Eklund ended, he said, when Toledo police officers responded to a 911 call from inside the building that mentioned a man who has “got a gun” and “won’t leave”. The caller didn’t mention that the man was a police officer.When Toledo police arrived, Mr Gaston recounted, they told Mr Eklund: “You know he’s a uniformed deputy sheriff, right? We can go anywhere in this building we want.”Washington Post

Pakistan arrests alleged Mumbai attacks mastermind again

17.07.2019 9:28


Pakistani authorities Wednesday detained the alleged mastermind of the 2008 Mumbai attacks, a security official said, as the country faces increased pressure to crack down on militants operating on its soil. Firebrand cleric Hafiz Saeed -- declared a global terrorist by the US and UN, and who has a $10 million US bounty on his head -- was taken into custody following a raid by counter-terrorism forces in the eastern city of Gujranwala. "Hafiz Saeed was going to Gujranwala to apply for bail in another case when he was arrested," said a security official with knowledge of the arrest, who requested anonymity.

From: news.yahoo.com

House Votes to Allow Pelosi to Call Trump’s Comments ‘Racist’ After Floor Fight

17.07.2019 9:28


House Democrats blocked an attempt to have Speaker Nancy Pelosi's speech in which she called several of President Trump's tweets "racist" stricken from the House record after fireworks erupted on the floor over her remarks excoriating the president."Every single member of this institution, Democratic and Republican, should join us in condemning the president's racist tweets," Pelosi said in an impassioned speech, referring to a resolution condemning Trump's tweets in which he tells several progressive congresswomen of color to "go back" to where they came from if they are unhappy with the U.S."Trump’s racist comments have legitimized fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color," the resolution reads.Democrats have rallied around the four Democratic congresswomen in question, Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley, and Rashida Tlaib, who have shot back at the president that he is a racist."To do anything less would be a shocking rejection of our values and a shameful abdication of our oath of office to protect the American people. I urge a unanimous vote," Pelosi said on the floor.Republican congressman Doug Collins immediately asked the speaker if she would care to "rephrase her comment," to which Pelosi responded she had "cleared my remarks with the parliamentarian before I read them."Collins then requested a point of order that Pelosi's remarks were "unparliamentary and her words be taken down."After over an hour of consideration, Democratic presiding chair Emanuel Cleaver abandoned the chair in frustration."We don't ever, ever want to pass up, it seems, an opportunity to escalate, and that's what this is," Cleaver said. "We want to just fight. I abandon the chair."House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer eventually took over the chair and said Pelosi's remarks were found "not in order," but Democrats prevailed in a subsequent vote on striking them from the House record, meaning they will remain."Characterization characterizing an action as racist … should not be used in debate," Hoyer said.Pelosi doubled down on her remarks before the vote."I stand by my statement," she told reporters. "I’m proud of the attention that’s being called to it because what the president said was completely inappropriate against our colleagues, but not just against them, against so many people in our country."

From: news.yahoo.com

'You must be stupid': Duterte says he won't be tried by international court

17.07.2019 9:28


Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has declared he will never be tried by an international court for mass killings in his war on drugs, and vowed no let up in a crackdown that he said he was winning and would see through "to the very end". In a television interview with a celebrity pastor, the firebrand leader said the Philippine justice system was working fine, so it would be "stupid" to imagine he would let an international court put him on trial.

From: news.yahoo.com

Big Guns: Army Prototypes Range-Doubling New Artillery Weapon to Outgun Russia

17.07.2019 9:28


The Army is building prototypes of a new artillery cannon that can more than double the range of existing weapons and vastly alter the strategic and tactical landscape shaping land war into the future.The Army program, called Extended Range Cannon Artillery, has been developing for several years; it is now entering a new phase through an Army deal with BAE Systems to build “Increment 1” prototypes.“This prototype phase will address capability gaps in the Army’s indirect fire systems and improve the rate and range of fire with the development of power distribution software and hardware integration solutions,” a BAE Systems statement said.During testing thus far, the Army has successfully fired a 155mm artillery round 62 kilometers - marking a technical breakthrough in the realm of land-based weapons and progressing toward its stated goal of being able to outrange and outgun Russian and Chinese weapons.Currently, most land-fired artillery shot from an M777 Towed Howitzer or Self-Propelled Howitzer are able to pinpoint targets out to 30km - so hitting 62km dramatically changes Army offensive attack capability. As part of an effort to ensure the heavy M777 is sufficiently mobile, the Army completed a “mobility” demonstration of ERCA prototypes last year.

From: news.yahoo.com

'They're like soldiers': Chicago's children are learning to save lives amid the gunfire

17.07.2019 9:22

“Young people aren't able to be young people. They're being forced to be adults starting at a young age,” said the founder of an anti-violence group.

From: www.nbcnews.com

Eric Garner's mother calls on Mayor Bill de Blasio to "step up" and fire officer involved in son's death

17.07.2019 9:04

The family of Eric Garner vows to continue their fight for justice after federal prosecutors decided not to charge a New York City police officer involved in his death. Garner died five years ago during an arrest for allegedly selling illegal cigarettes in Staten Island. Police officers knocked him to the ground and put him in a choke hold. His death ignited demonstrations worldwide. Eric Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss why Mayor Bill de Blasio needs to "step up" and take action against the officer involved in her son's death.

From: www.cbsnews.com

Officer involved in the death of Eric Garner faces furor, calls to resign

17.07.2019 8:06

There are new calls for New York police officer Daniel Pantaleo to be fired, after federal prosecutors decided this week not to charge him in the chokehold death of Eric Garner. Garner's death five years ago today prompted a national conversation about policing and race. Jeff Pegues reports.

From: www.cbsnews.com

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